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Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03
 
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Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03 course at a glance

Pages
788
No of slides in the Manual
Exercises
23
Total No of Exercises
Sections
44
No of main topics, see index below
Public
No
Public course in the UK and Ireland
On-Site
Yes
We can come to your venue
Level
1
1 - Beginners
2 - Intermediate
3 - Advanced
Days
5
Week days but we can put on weekend courses

Course Name: Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03

Duration:
Minimum skill level required:
On-Site course:
Public course:
Sections:
No of exercises:
No of pages in the manual:
Pre-Requisite course(s):
Suggested further course(s):
Price guide:
5 days
1 (1 - Beginner, 2 - Experienced 3 - Advanced)
Yes
No
44
23
788
None
Java 12 Swing with Eclipse 2019-03
Contact us for the latest pricing
PDF - Course IndexClick to view the PDF index for the course

PDF - Exercise ExampleClick to view the PDF sample exercise

PDF - Sample PagesClick to view the PDF sample course pages

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Synopsis for Java 12 Eclipse 2019-03 Programming training course

What a gift it must be to be a musician, to take an instrument and to bring it to life with melody and sound for others to appreciate it, by all accounts it takes 10000 hours to master an instrument, unless of course you are Mozart or Eric Clapton but I think they were prodigies who needed an awful less practice than we mere mortals …

So how long does it take to become a seasoned Java Programmer? Well I'm afraid to say longer than this five day course, being a Java programmer is rather like learning the guitar, you have to start somewhere, learning the chords and riffs and striving to play a piece without looking at your hands, sticking out your tongue in intense concentration. If you will imagine, our Java 12 Programming course is your introduction to the chords needed to play sweet music, in this course Eclipse will be your instrument and our Java Consultant your tutor. You may not need 10000 hours to master Java but practice makes perfect and we provide the perfect foundation for you to continue learning to become a Java Programmer, sadly you'll never be invited to the Royal Albert Hall to give a Java recital but your professional skills will undoubtedly make its way to making other people's lives that much better by keeping planes in the air, washing machines work properly and of course lovely Android apps which no one can do without.

Unlike learning guitar you don’t have to be a prodigy to learn Java, this course starts at the beginning teaching the syntax, the structure, the style that will help you learn quicker and of course, better.

Its five days duration and it is packed full of exercises for you to practice what we have just talked about and unlike a violin you won't make other people suffer on a course when you hit the wrong note (or key), our Consultant is there to support and help you interpret any problems you may encounter, and don’t worry we've experienced them ourselves and many times on these courses. You have to learn the rudimentary steps before you can be confident with your skills.

This is not the current version of Java or indeed Eclipse, but it may be the one you use, we can come to your premises to give you the course or you can come to us at our premises in Swansea, if you are on your own we can during certain times of the year give one to one training so speak to our training course consultants to discuss your requirements.

The latest version of this course can be found by either visiting the menu at the top of this page or by clicking on the advert found on this page, in the meantime, take the opportunity to read our reviews, download the course contents and maybe tell us what you interested in and we'll give you a no obligation free quotation, maybe one day you'll be telling people you owe it all to Seer Computing in the same way Bert Weedon was praised by Jimmy Page … pass me my axe …

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Click for the contact form for the Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03 training course

Java 12 Eclipse 2019-03 Programming course
Exercise highlights (Some of the many things you'll practice)

Selecting from Oracle and MySQL databases
Dates and Calendars in Java 12
Writing CSV files
Using parameters in Eclipse 2019-03 and Java 12
Practical use of Oops architecture

Index of Java 12 Eclipse 2019-03 Programming training course

Section
Section Name
Page


One
Introduction to Java
2

 
- Usage of Java
3

 
- Structure of Java
4

 
- Flexibility of Java Programming
5

 
- Using the Eclipse Software
6

Two
Running Java in Eclipse
7

 
- Introduction
8

 
- Using Eclipse
9

 
- Workspace Launcher
11

 
- Workspace in Eclipse
16

 
- Projects in Eclipse
17

 
- Opening Projects in Eclipse
18

 
- Importing Projects in Eclipse
19

 
- Running Projects in Eclipse
23

 
- Viewing results in the Eclipse Console
24

 
- The Eclipse Console properties
26

Three
First Steps to Programming in Java
27

 
- Introduction to Java Programming
28

 
- Anatomy of Java Programming
29

 
- Using System.out.println in Java
33

 
- Passing Arguments in a Java Program
35

 
- Packages in Java Programming
36

 
- Naming Java modules
37

 
- Commenting in Java Programs
38

 
- Editing Java in Eclipse
39

 
- The SRC folder
41

 
- Editing the code in the SRC
43

 
- Examining the Workspace Folder
45

 
- Examining the Workspace
46

Four
Creating Projects and Classes in Eclipse
48

 
- Introduction
49

 
- Creating Projects
50

 
- Importing Projects
56

 
- Importing Projects from other Folders
57

 
- Importing Archives into Workspace
60

 
- Exporting a Project
63

 
- Deleting Projects
67

 
- Creating Packages
68

 
- Creating Classes
71

 
- Exporting Classes into Projects
74

 
- Importing Classes into Projects
75

 
- Copying Classes
78

 
- Incorporating Existing Classes
80

Five
Using the Java Editor in Eclipse
81

 
- Introduction
82

 
- Folding
84

 
- Line Numbers
87

 
- Creating Bookmarks
88

 
- Using Bookmarks
89

 
- Using Tasks
93

 
- Correcting Errors
98

 
- Syntax Rules
99

 
- Error Checking
100

 
- Colour Coding
102

 
- Hints while typing
103

 
- Bracket Location
105

 
- Exercise One
106

Six
Java Strings
108

 
- Introduction
109

 
- Using Escape Characters
110

 
- Concatenating of Strings
113

 
- Using Methods with Strings
116

 
- Using the Java Editor with Methods
117

 
- Methods with Parameters / Arguments
120

 
- Selecting Substrings
122

 
- indexOf
123

 
- lastIndexOf
124

 
- Finding the index of a Substring
129

 
- Finding the Length of a String
128

 
- Capitalizing Strings Example
129

 
- Exercise Two
130

Seven
Using Numbers in Java
133

 
- Performing Calculations
134

 
- Calculations and Concatenation
136

 
- Calculations and Precedence
138

 
- Using Concatenation with Numbers
139

 
- Using Methods with Numbers
141

 
- Exercise Three
144

Eight
Creating Variables in Java
145

 
- Introduction
146

 
- Naming Conventions
148

 
- Using Final to create a Constant value
152

 
- Primitive Datatypes
154

 
- byte Datatype
155

 
- long Datatype
156

 
- short Datatype
158

 
- int Datatype
159

 
- float Datatype
160

 
- double Datatype
161

 
- Compatibility between Primitive Datatypes
162

 
- Casting between Primitive Datatypes
163

 
- Casting and Converting Values
164

 
- byte Casting
165

 
- double Casting
166

 
- int Casting
167

 
- long Datatype
168

 
- float Casting
169

 
- short Casting
170

 
- char Datatype
171

 
- char Casting
172

 
- String Casting
173

 
- boolean Datatype
174

 
- Manipulating Variables
175

 
- Incrementing Variables with Postfix
179

 
- Postfix versus Prefix
180

 
- Number Formatting in Java
181

 
- Exercise Four
189

Nine
Wrapper Classes in Java
193

 
- Introduction
194

 
- Using MAX_VALUE
196

 
- Declaring Wrappers
197

 
- Populating Wrapper Classes
198

 
- Postfix Wrappers
201

 
- Number Formatting
202

 
- Converting Numeric Wrappers
203

 
- Converting Numeric Wrappers to String
204

 
- String to Numeric Datatypes (decode)
205

 
- String to Numeric Datatypes (parseInt)
206

 
- String to Numeric Datatypes (valueOf)
207

 
- Numeric Datatypes to String using valueOf()
208

 
- Character Class Methods in Java
209

 
- Converting String to char
210

 
- Exercise Five
211

Ten
Conditional Tests
214

 
- Making Decisions in Java
215

 
- Testing Booleans in Java
222

 
- Else Conditions in Java
224

 
- Else if Conditions in Java
225

 
- Nesting Conditions in Java
226

 
- Ternary if-else Operator
227

 
- Case Switch Conditions
229

 
- Using Break in Java Switches
231

 
- Using Java Switches with Strings (v7+)
233

 
- Using Java Switches with Bytes (v7+)
234

 
- Using Java Switches with Shorts (v7+)
235

 
- Using Java Switches with Wrappers (v7+)
236

 
- Compound Conditions in Java
237

 
- AND Conditions in Java (&&)
238

 
- OR Conditions in Java (||)
239

 
- XOR Conditions in Java (^)
240

 
- Short-circuiting Conditions in Java
243

 
- Exercise Six
243

Eleven
Conditional Tests with Wrappers
248

 
- Class Conditions
249

 
- Class Methods
251

 
- String Class Methods
252

 
- Character Class Methods
254

 
- Boolean Class Methods
256

 
- Exercise Seven
257

Twelve
Arrays
260

 
- Array Variables in Java
261

 
- Declaring Arrays in Java ([])
262

 
- Using copyOf to extend an array
266

 
- Declaring Empty Arrays in Java ([])
267

 
- Populating Arrays in Java
268

 
- Multi-Dimensional Arrays
269

 
- Defining Multi-Dimensional Arrays
270

 
- Populating Multi-Dimensional Arrays
272

 
- Cloning Arrays
274

 
- Converting Char Arrays to Strings
275

 
- Converting Strings to Arrays
276

 
- Sorting Arrays
277

 
- Exercise Eight
278

Thirteen
Object
282

 
- The Object Superclass in Java
283

 
- Creating and utilising Objects
284

Fourteen
Looping
285

 
- Looping Methods in Java
286

 
- While Looping in Java
287

 
- Do While Looping in Java
289

 
- For Looping in Java
290

 
- For-Each Looping in Java
291

 
- Terminating a Loop in Eclipse
292

 
- Nested Looping in Java
293

 
- Branching in Looping in Java
294

 
- Continue Looping in Java
295

 
- Break Looping in Java
297

 
- Labelling Looping in Java
298

 
- The Break Statement in Java
299

 
- Breaking with a Loop Label
300

 
- Continuing with a Loop Label
301

Fifteen
Passing Arguments in Eclipse
302

 
- Sending Arguments to Methods
303

 
- Using Eclipse to pass arguments
305

 
- Using length with arguments
309

 
- Exercise Nine
310

Sixteen
Multiple Methods
315

 
- Introduction
316

 
- Multiple Methods
317

 
- Overloading
322

 
- Returning Values in Java
326

 
- Returning Wrappers in Java
333

 
- Returning Arrays in Java
334

 
- Using varargs in Java
335

 
- Definition of scope
336

 
- Exercise Ten
339

Seventeen
Multiple Classes
341

 
- Multiple Classes / Single File
342

 
- Multiple Classes
344

 
- Accessing Variables
345

 
- Nested Classes
346

 
- Finalising Class Variables
350

 
- Accessing from other Classes
352

 
- Exercise Eleven
354

Eighteen
Packages
358

 
- Introduction
359

 
- Definition of a Package
360

 
- Multi-Level Packages
361

 
- Accessing and Importing Packages
366

 
- Classes outside Packages
372

 
- Exercise Twelve
374

Nineteen
Regular Expressions in Java
375

 
- Introduction
376

 
- Line Anchors
379

 
- Case Sensitivity
380

 
- Using the Dot (Any Character)
381

 
- Counting Characters {Intervals}
383

 
- Character Range Lists
386

 
- Excluding Character Lists
390

 
- Metacharacters in Java
391

 
- Or Patterns (Alternatives)
393

 
- Using the Question Mark (Optional)
394

 
- Using the Plus sign (Mandatory)
396

 
- Using the Star sign (Optional)
397

 
- Negative Lookahead
398

 
- POSIX in Java
399

 
- Using String methods for Regex – matches()
401

 
- Using String methods for Regex – replaceAll()
402

 
- Using String methods for Regex – replaceFirst()
404

 
- Using String methods for Regex – split()
405

 
- Exercise Thirteen
407

Twenty
Vectors
412

 
- Using Vectors in Java
413

 
- Populating Vectors using add() method
414

 
- Populating Vectors using addAll() method
415

 
- Counting number of values in a Vector
417

 
- Accessing values in a Vector
418

 
- Using Loops with Vectors
419

 
- Changing existing values in a Vector
420

 
- Sorting values in a Vector
421

 
- Miscellaneous methods to use with Vectors
422

 
- Using Vectors in Java
423

Twenty One
Hashtables
424

 
- Creating Hashtables
425

 
- Populating Hashtables
426

 
- Accessing values in a Hashtable
427

 
- Accessing values in Hashtables with For-Each
428

 
- Some useful methods for Hashtables
429

Twenty Two
Enumeration
430

 
- Introduction
431

 
- Using Enumeration
432

Twenty Three
Concepts of OOPS
434

 
- Introduction
435

 
- Classes and Instances (Instantiation)
436

 
- Constructor
437

 
- Polymorphism
440

 
- Inheritance
442

 
- IS-A
444

 
- Overriding and Overloading
445

 
- Extends
446

 
- Interfaces and Implementation
447

 
- Abstraction
448

 
- Encapsulation
449

 
- Packages
450

Twenty Four
Interfaces
451

 
- Introduction
452

 
- Implementing Interfaces
453

 
- The Hierarchy of Interfaces Using Extends
457

 
- The purpose of @Override
460

Twenty Five
Access Methods in Java
461

 
- Class Access Levels in Java
462

 
- Method Access Levels in Java
463

 
- Variable Access Levels in Java
466

Twenty Six
Using OOPS in Java
467

 
- Introduction
468

 
- Instances and Constructors
469

 
- Instances and Constructors across Packages
472

 
- The 'This' keyword
473

 
- Overriding and Extending Classes
480

 
- Using the Super keyword
488

 
- Exercise Fourteen
489

Twenty Seven
Exception Handling in Java
495

 
- Error Handling in Java
496

 
- Trying Exceptions in Java
497

 
- Catching Exceptions in Java
498

 
- Throw Exceptions in Java
505

 
- Using Finally in Java
508

 
- Throws and Modular Programming
510

 
- Exercise Fifteen
521

Twenty Eight
Using Java Swing with Eclipse
522

 
- Introduction
523

 
- Using Dialog Boxes
524

 
- Using Message Dialogs
526

 
- Using Confirm Dialogs
531

 
- Using Input Dialogs
534

 
- Using Icons in Java
536

 
- Using ImageIcon in Java
537

 
- Using Option Dialogs
538

 
- Making a Beep in Java
544

 
- Exercise Sixteen
545

Twenty Nine
Enums
548

 
- Introduction
549

 
- Declaring a basic Enum
550

 
- Testing Enums
554

 
- Using the values() method with Enums
555

 
- Creating methods in Enums
556

 
- Exercise Seventeen
562

Thirty
HashMaps
564

 
- Creating HashMaps
565

 
- Populating HashMaps
566

 
- Populating HashMaps using putAll()
567

 
- Accessing values in HashMaps
568

 
- Accessing values in HashMaps with For-Each
569

 
- Accessing keys in HashMaps with For-Each
570

 
- Some useful methods for HashMaps
571

Thirty One
Arraylist
572

 
- Creating ArrayLists
573

 
- Populating an ArrayList
575

 
- Populating an ArrayList with addAll
577

 
- Counting number of values in an ArrayList
578

 
- Accessing values in an ArrayList
579

 
- Using Loops with ArrayLists
580

 
- Changing existing values in an ArrayList
581

 
- Sorting values in an ArrayList
582

Thirty Two
Iterator
583

 
- Introduction
584

 
- Using Iterator
585

 
- Using Iterator with remove()
586

 
- Using ListIterator
587

 
- Exercise Eighteen
588

Thirty Three
Dates in Java
592

 
- Using Dates in Java
593

 
- Date and Time Variables
595

 
- currentTimeMillis()
597

 
- DateFormat in Java
598

 
- Placing Strings into Dates
601

 
- SimpleDateFormat Method
603

 
- getTimeInstance Method in Java
606

 
- SimpleDateFormat Method for Time in Java
609

Thirty Four
Calendars in Java
611

 
- Calendar Class in Java
612

 
- Leniency in Calendars
617

 
- Populating Calendars
618

 
- Populating Calendars using set()
620

 
- Changing Calendars using add()
621

 
- Gregorian Calendar in Java
623

 
- Exercise Nineteen
627

Thirty Five
System Properties
630

 
- Using System Properties in Java
631

 
- List of System Properties in Java
632

 
- System.getProperty
633

Thirty Six
File Handling in Java
643

 
- File Handling in Java
635

 
- Reading from Files in Java
637

 
- Using the Buffered Reader
641

 
- Writing to Files in Java
643

 
- Using the BufferedWriter in Java
645

 
- Exercise Twenty
646

Thirty Seven
Reading XML Files
648

 
- Introduction
649

 
- Reading XML in Java
650

 
- Getting the Elements of the File
651

Thirty Eight
Reading and Writing Zip Files in Java
657

 
- Introduction
658

 
- Counting Files in a Zip File
659

 
- Naming Files in a Zip File
660

 
- Reading Contents of a Zip using Enumeration
661

 
- Reading Contents of a Zip using a ZipEntry
663

 
- Writing to a Zip File
665

Thirty Nine
Accessing MySQL Databases in Java
668

 
- Introduction
669

 
- Incorporating MySQL into Projects
670

 
- Using MySQL
675

 
- Counting Records in MySQL
676

 
- Displaying Records in MySQL
679

 
- Displaying Table Structure in MySQL
681

 
- Using the 'get' method with the ResultSet
685

 
- Updating records in MySQL
686

 
- Deleting and Inserting records in MySQL
688

 
- Date Formats for MySQL
689

 
- Performing DDL in MySQL with Java
690

 
- Creating, Altering and Dropping MySQL Tables
691

 
- Running Java and MySQL on the Command Line
693

 
- Exercise Twenty One
696

Forty
Accessing Oracle Databases in Java
702

 
- Introduction
703

 
- Incorporating Oracle into Projects
704

 
- Using Oracle
709

 
- Counting Records in Oracle
710

 
- Displaying Tables in a User
713

 
- Displaying Columns in a Table
715

 
- Displaying Records in Oracle
717

 
- Updating records in Oracle
721

 
- Deleting and Inserting records in Oracle
722

 
- Inserting / Updating Dates in Oracle
723

 
- Performing DDL in Oracle with Java
724

 
- Creating, Altering and Dropping Oracle Tables
725

 
- Running Java and Oracle on the Command Line
727

 
- Exercise Twenty Two
729

Forty One
Developer Defined Exceptions
735

 
- Developer Defined Exceptions in Java
736

 
- serialVersionUID
737

Forty Two
Creating Java Modules
743

 
- Introduction
744

 
- module-info.java
746

 
- module-info.java keywords
748

 
- module-info.java exports
749

 
- module-info.java requires
751

 
- module-info.java other settings
752

 
- Steps to using modules
753

 
- Using the Module
758

Forty Three
Creating JAR files in Eclipse
759

 
- Introduction
760

 
- Creating a JAR file in Eclipse
761

Forty Four
Using Javadoc in Eclipse
764

 
- Documenting Java Programs
765

 
- Using Javadoc
766

 
- Using Javadoc for classes
767

 
- Using Javadoc for methods
768

 
- Javadoc Tags
769

 
- Suggestions for Class documentation
770

 
- Using HTML with Javadoc
771

 
- Generating Javadoc in Eclipse
774

 
- Exercise Twenty Three
783

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Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03 training

List of Public Courses
Select the location for this training course
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Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03
 
Name:
Company:
Email:
Telephone:
Training type:
Delegates:


Additional Information
 

Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03 course at a glance

Duration: 5 days
Minimum skill level required: 1
(1 - Beginner, 2 - Experienced
3 - Advanced)
On-Site course:
Yes

Public course: No
No of pages in the manual: 788
Sections: 44
No of exercises: 23
Pre-Requisite course(s):
None
Suggested further course(s):
Java 12 Swing with Eclipse 2019-03

Price guide: Contact us for the latest pricing

enquiries@seercomputing.com
or call us on +44 (0) 800 157 7519.

PDF - Course Index

PDF - Exercise Example

PDF - Sample Pages

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Synopsis for Java 12 Eclipse 2019-03 Programming training course

Rumour has it that the programming language Java was thought up by a couple of Sun employees in a local coffee shop in California and we can only imagine that's where the name originated too, like all urban myths there may be an element of truth in this but the reality is that Java has proved to be a versatile and stable platform for nearly 25 years. It can be found in many different products from washing machines to Android smartphones, in fact, we use it for our Apps including the A – Z of Yoga, so it’s a great programming skill to master, highly saleable on the job market.

This version of our Java programming course is available both onsite and as a public course which is scheduled throughout the UK and Ireland at regular intervals, classes are capped at 6 delegates per public course and we will run another the following week if they become over-subscribed, if we present the course at your venue (on-site) we are very flexible regarding numbers.

Java can be run from the Dos command line and we have a version of this course which teaches precisely that, but this course is taught using the latest version of Eclipse, if you haven’t come across Eclipse before, it’s a free to download product which supports a massive number of programming languages, Java obviously being one of them. Eclipse is a GUI product and although it has a bewildering number of menu options (most not related to Java !!) it really is a great tool to learn Java with, if nothing else because of its comprehensive syntax suggestion list , it won't put us out of work but it can make our life as Consultants that much easier particularly if you are having a hard time remembering the correct method !

Let's talk about the actual course, well firstly we'll introduce the Eclipse interface, Delegates familiar with a windows environment will have no trouble with the navigation of the product but it's our job to show you where each element of the Java program goes and we will concentrate on that, once you know where you type the code, we'll teach you what to type !

The syntax of Java is quite strict /strong, so we carefully explain at each stage how each new technique is introduced into the code, this is backed up in our manual with working examples and comprehensive exercises throughout the five day course. We begin with the basics, the syntax, fortunately Eclipse creates that for us every module we create, however our philosophy is that the Delegate must understand what each part of the basic code does regardless of whether it has been typed for us or not. A breakdown of the content of the course is given in the Index section below, here we are discussing some key or interesting points of the course, if we've not mentioned it and you really need to learn it check below, we cover all important points of Java programming but we'd like you to know that we do !!

Programming techniques in Java are the order of the first day, our Consultant will discuss the various datatypes available in the product then they will move onto how they are populated and handled, slightly dry bread but it is a necessary evil in order for the Delegate to understand what to use and when, once they've done an exercise on datatypes we start using them in techniques such as arrays and believe us when we say Java has a bonkers number of different methods available for use with arrays, their flexibility is amazing and once we introduce looping the possibilities are endless for data processing.

The Java programming language is an Object Orientated Programming language (Oops), and in a nutshell this means massive flexibility regarding reusable code, easy to use ? well once we've explained it, you'll understand how it works, in fact we gradually introduce new techniques throughout the course.

Java is now owned by Oracle, and as it’s the largest Database 'manufacturer' in the world its only appropriate that we look at extracting and using data from an Oracle Database. Not to exclude those people who use a MySQL database (also owned by Oracle) we have a further section which deals with using Java against a MySQL database, both have exercises after the presentations and we tend to let the Delegates decide which Database they wish to work with, if its both we support their choice and give them the time to complete both.

So that’s about it, we tried to talk about a very large five day course in a nutshell, we've left out a lot which will come up in the course and we know that delegates come out a lot more knowledgeable about Java than they started with on the Monday morning.

Just a few brief comments about the actual administration of the course, we aim to help all Delegates regardless of their previous experience in Programming, therefore lots of our exercise sections have 'additional' parts so that people who are faster are occupied while the others complete the mandatory sections.

If the courses are given at your venue, then we are very flexible regarding start and end times and indeed course numbers. At the end of the course the Delegates are encouraged to take copies of their code, but we also supply a CD of our solutions which gives a great platform for the Delegates to continue with their work.

Scroll through these locations and find the one nearest to you.

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Sections of Java 12 with Eclipse 2019-03

1
Introduction to Java

2
Running Java in Eclipse

3
First Steps to Programming in Java

4
Creating Projects and Classes in Eclipse

5
Using the Java Editor in Eclipse

6
Java Strings

7
Using Numbers in Java

8
Creating Variables in Java

9
Wrapper Classes in Java

10
Conditional Tests

11
Conditional Tests with Wrappers

12
Arrays

13
Object

14
Looping

15
Passing Arguments in Eclipse

16
Multiple Methods

17
Multiple Classes

18
Packages

19
Regular Expressions in Java

20
Vectors

21
Hashtables

22
Enumeration

23
Concepts of OOPS

24
Interfaces

25
Access Methods in Java

26
Using OOPS in Java

27
Exception Handling in Java

28
Using Java Swing with Eclipse

29
Enums

30
HashMaps

31
Arraylist

32
Iterator

33
Dates in Java

34
Calendars in Java

35
System Properties

36
File Handling in Java

37
Reading XML Files

38
Reading and Writing Zip Files in Java

39
Accessing MySQL Databases in Java

40
Accessing Oracle Databases in Java

41
Developer Defined Exceptions

42
Creating Java Modules

43
Creating JAR files in Eclipse

44
Using Javadoc in Eclipse

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Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03
 
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Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03 course at a glance

Duration: 5 days
Minimum skill level required: 1
(1 - Beginner, 2 - Experienced
3 - Advanced)
On-Site course:
Yes

Public course: No
No of pages in the manual: 788
Sections: 44
No of exercises: 23
Pre-Requisite course(s):
None
Suggested further course(s):
Java 12 Swing with Eclipse 2019-03

Price guide: Contact us for the latest pricing

enquiries@seercomputing.com
or call us on +44 (0) 800 157 7519.

PDF - Course Index

PDF - Exercise Example

PDF - Sample Pages

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Click for the contact form for the Java 12 Programming with Eclipse 2019-03 training course

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