Top
Email
Bottom
PLSQL 11g
 
Name:
Company:
Email:
Telephone:
Training type:
Delegates:


Additional Information
 

Download our latest
Android and iPhone apps ...
Click on whichever one of our Apps you are interested in

PLSQL 11g course at a glance

Pages
930No of slides in the Manual
Exercises
20Total No of Exercises
Sections
51No of main topics, see index below
Public
NoPublic course in the UK and Ireland
On-Site
YesWe can come to your venue
Level
21 - Beginners
2 - Intermediate
3 - Advanced
Days
5Week days but we can put on weekend courses
Duration:
Minimum skill level required:
On-Site course:
Public course:
Sections:
No of exercises:
No of pages in the manual:
Pre-Requisite course(s):
Suggested further course(s):
Price guide:
5 days
2 (1 - Beginner, 2 - Experienced 3 - Advanced)
Yes
No
51
20
930
Oracle Essential SQL 11g
None
Contact us for the latest pricing

Index of Oracle PLSQL 11g training course

Section
Contents
Page

One
PLSQL Introduction
2

 
- Procedural Language for SQL
3

Two
PLSQL Structure
5

 
- Basic Structure of PLSQL
6

 
- The Declaration Section in PLSQL
7

 
- Local Variables in PLSQL
8

 
- Naming Local Variables in PLSQL
10

 
- Quoted Identifier Variables
12

 
- Variable Datatypes (varchar2)
16

 
- Variable Datatypes (numbers)
17

 
- Variable Datatypes (number)
18

 
- Variable Datatypes (decimal)
21

 
- Variable Datatypes (integer)
22

 
- Variable Datatypes (pls_integer)
23

 
- Variable Datatypes (binary_integer)
24

 
- Variable Datatypes (natural)
25

 
- Variable Datatypes (naturaln)
26

 
- Variable Datatypes (positive)
27

 
- Variable Datatypes (positiven)
28

 
- Variable Datatypes (signtype)
29

 
- Variable Datatypes (simple_integer)
30

 
- Variable Datatypes (boolean)
31

 
- Variable Datatypes - Constants
33

 
- Running PLSQL in SQL*Plus
34

 
- Compiling PLSQL in SQL*Plus
36

 
- Common Compilation Problems
40

 
- Commenting PLSQL
42

 
- Documenting PLSQL
44

Three
The SQL*Plus Interface
45

 
- Introduction
46

 
- Anatomy of SQL*Plus
51

 
- ORA-01017: invalid username/password; logon denied
52

 
- ORA-12154: TNS:could not resolve the connect identifier
53

 
- Exiting an SQL*Plus Session
54

 
- Using the DOS Window
55

 
- Copying and Pasting
56

 
- Using the Function Keys
59

 
- Using the Line Editor in SQL*Plus
60

 
- Using the Editor in SQL*Plus
61

 
- SQL*Plus Environment Settings
62

 
- File Manipulation in SQL*Plus
63

 
- Spooling Results in SQL*Plus
64

 
- Changing Passwords / Clearing the Screen in SQL
65

 
- File Manipulation in SQL*Plus
63

 
- Exercise One
66

Four
Performing Simple DML in PLSQL
69

 
- Introduction
70

 
- Using Local Variables
71

 
- Declaring Variables Using %Type
74

 
- Using Substitution Values in PLSQL
78

 
- Exercise Two
81

Five
Performing Conditional Statements in PLSQL
83

 
- If .. Then Statements
84

 
- If .. Then Else Statements
87

 
- If .. Then Elsif Statements
89

 
- Combining Tests
90

 
- Nesting Conditions
91

 
- Boolean Conditions
92

Six
Communicating from PLSQL
93

 
- Messaging Via PLSQL
94

 
- Exercise Three
99

Seven
Exception Handling
101

 
- Introduction
102

 
- The When Clause
105

 
- The When Others Clause
106

 
- Raise_Application_Error
110

 
- Oracle Defined Exceptions
114

 
- Access_into_Null (ORA-06530)
115

 
- Case_Not_Found (ORA-06592 )
117

 
- Collection_Is_Null (ORA-06531)
118

 
- Cursor_Already_Open (ORA-06511)
120

 
- Dup_Val_On_Index (ORA-00001)
121

 
- Invalid_Cursor (ORA-01001)
122

 
- Invalid_Number (ORA-01722)
123

 
- Login_Denied (ORA-01017)
124

 
- No_Data_Found (ORA-01403)
126

 
- Not_Logged_On (ORA-01012)
127

 
- Program_Error (ORA-06501)
128

 
- Rowtype_Mismatch (ORA-06504)
129

 
- Self_is_Null (ORA-30625)
131

 
- Storage_Error (ORA-06500)
134

 
- Subscript_Beyond_Count (ORA-06533)
135

 
- Subscript_outside_limit (ORA-06532)
136

 
- Sys_Invalid_Rowid (ORA-01410)
138

 
- Timeout_On_Resource (ORA-00051)
139

 
- Too_Many_Rows (ORA-01422)
140

 
- Value_Error (ORA-06502)
141

 
- Zero_Divide (ORA-01476)
142

 
- Raising User Defined Exceptions
143

 
- Pragma Exceptions in PLSQL
146

 
- Grouping Exceptions in PLSQL
150

 
- Alternative Way to Handle SQL Errors in PLSQL
151

 
- Handling SQL Errors in PLSQL
152

 
- Advanced SQLErrm
154

 
- Exercise Four
155

Eight
Implicit Cursors
158

 
- Using Implicit Cursors in PLSQL
159

 
- Using Implicit Cursors to Select Records
161

 
- Exceptions in PLSQL
162

 
- Attributes of Implicit Cursors
164

 
- SQL%FOUND
165

 
- SQL%NOTFOUND
166

 
- SQL%ROWCOUNT
167

Nine
Sub-Blocking in PLSQL
168

 
- Introduction
169

 
- Defining
170

 
- Re-Raising Exceptions in PLSQL
172

 
- Exercise Five
175

Ten
Explicit Cursors
180

 
- Using Explicit Cursors in PLSQL
181

 
- How Explicit Cursors Work
183

 
- Attributes of an Explicit Cursor
186

 
- Passing Parameters to Explicit Cursors
189

 
- Explicit Cursors Versus Implicit Cursors
192

 
- Exercise Six
193

Eleven
Using Sequences in PLSQL 11g
196

Twelve
Loop Processing
199

 
- Iterative Processing in PLSQL
200

 
- Basic Looping in PLSQL
201

 
- While Looping in PLSQL
205

 
- For Looping in PLSQL
208

 
- Using Dates in For Loops in PLSQL
212

 
- Using Characters in For Loops in PLSQL
213

 
- Implicit Cursor Looping in PLSQL
214

 
- Explicit Cursor Looping in PLSQL
217

 
- Using other Loops with Explicit Cursors
219

 
- Loop Labels in PLSQL
222

 
- Loop Continue and Continue When
224

 
- Exercise Seven
228

Thirteen
PL/SQL Database Objects
234

 
- PLSQL Objects
235

 
- Compiling PLSQL Objects
236

 
- Metadata For PLSQL Objects
237

 
- Re-Compiling PLSQL Objects
238

 
- Dropping PLSQL Objects
240

 
- Passing Parameters in PLSQL
241

 
- Passing Parameters in PLSQL using Positional Notation
242

 
- Passing Parameters in PLSQL using Named Notation
244

 
- Using Mixed Notation in SQL
245

 
- Metadata (User Source)
247

 
- Describing PLSQL Objects in SQL*Plus
248

Fourteen
Programmer Defined Functions
249

 
- Syntax of Functions in Oracle
250

 
- Suggested Naming Convention of Functions in Oracle
253

 
- Function Example in PLSQL
254

 
- Running Functions in SQL and PLSQL
256

 
- Running Functions in Oracle
257

 
- Exercise Eight
258

Fifteen
Programmer Defined Procedures
267

 
- Syntax of Procedures in Oracle
268

 
- Example of Procedures in Oracle
270

 
- Executing Procedures in Oracle within SQL Plus
271

 
- Executing Procedures in Oracle within PLSQL
272

Sixteen
Sub-programming Techniques
273

 
- Introduction
274

 
- Example
275

 
- Exercise Nine
277

Seventeen
Autonomous Transactions in PLSQL
280

 
- Introduction
281

 
- Example of an Autonomous Transaction
283

 
- Rollback in Autonomous Transactions
291

 
- Using Autonomous Transactions in Triggers
292

Eighteen
Packaging Programmer Defined Programs
295

 
- Syntax of Packages in Oracle
296

 
- Compiling of Packages in Oracle
301

 
- Private Processes in PLSQL Packages
302

 
- Executing Packages in Oracle
304

 
- Handling Exceptions in Packages in PLSQL
305

 
- Exercise Ten
307

Nineteen
DML Triggers in Oracle
308

 
- Oracle Triggers Introduction
309

 
- DML Triggers Introduction
310

 
- DML Triggers Timing Points
312

 
- DML Triggers When Conditions
313

 
- DML Triggers When Conditions Examples
314

 
- DML Triggers Suggested Naming Conventions
316

 
- Syntax of DML Triggers in PLSQL
318

 
- Referencing Values within Triggers
319

 
- Checking the Event which fired the DML Trigger
323

 
- Using the Follows syntax to dictate Trigger Firing
325

 
- ORA-25022: cannot reference a trigger of different type
329

 
- Using the Disable syntax when Compiling Triggers
330

 
- Enabling/Disabling Triggers in an Oracle Database
331

 
- Metadata for Triggers (User_Triggers)
333

 
- Mutating DML Triggers in Oracle
334

 
- Exercise Eleven
338

Twenty
Instead Of Triggers
345

 
- Introduction to Instead Of Triggers
346

 
- Syntax of an Instead Of Trigger in Oracle
349

 
- Example of an Instead Of Trigger
351

 
- Deleting Records in Oracle using an Instead Of
359

 
- Using Follows in an Instead Of Trigger
360

Twenty One
Compound Triggers
361

 
- Introduction to Compound Triggers
362

 
- Syntax for Table Compound Triggers
364

 
- Declaration Section
365

 
- Timing Points
366

 
- Before Statement
367

 
- Before Each Row
368

 
- After Each Row
369

 
- After Statement
370

 
- Compound Triggers for Views
371

Twenty Two
System Triggers
372

 
- Introduction to System Triggers
373

 
- Syntax for System Triggers in Oracle
374

 
- System Event Triggers
375

 
- User Event Triggers
376

 
- Schema Event Triggers
380

 
- Database Level Attributes for System Triggers
386

 
- Exercise Twelve
387

Twenty Three
Rowtypes in PLSQL
396

 
- Using %Rowtype in PLSQL
397

 
- Declaring a Variable as a %Rowtype
398

 
- Referencing a %Rowtype Variable
399

 
- Populating a Variable which is a %Rowtype
400

 
- Passing a %Rowtype between Processes
403

 
- Declaring a Cursor %Rowtype
405

 
- Using Rowtype for DML
408

Twenty Four
Advanced Cursors in Oracle 11g
410

 
- For Update with Explicit Cursors
411

 
- Where Current of Explicit Cursors
412

 
- Example of Updating with Explicit Cursors
413

 
- Using Nowait with Explicit Cursors
414

 
- Using Skip Locked with Explicit Cursors
415

 
- Using Wait with an Explicit Cursors
416

 
- Using Rowid with Explicit Cursors
417

 
- Using Returning Into in PLSQL
418

 
- Ref Cursors in PLSQL
424

 
- Strongly Typed Ref Cursors in PLSQL
425

 
- Weakly Typed Ref Cursors in PLSQL
427

 
- Sys_refcursor in PLSQL
428

 
- Using Sys_Refcursors with SQL
430

Twenty Five
Encrypting Code
434

 
- Introduction
435

 
- Using Wrap.exe to encrypt processes in Oracle
436

 
- Example of using Wrap.exe to encrypt processes
439

 
- Using DBMS_DDL.CREATE_WRAPPED Function
441

Twenty Six
Savepoints in PLSQL
445

 
- Using Savepoints in a PLSQL process
446

 
- Example of Savepoints in PLSQL process
447

Twenty Seven
Case Statements and Case Expressions
448

 
- Introduction
449

 
- Using Searched Case in PLSQL
450

 
- Using Case in PLSQL
451

 
- Using Nested Case in PLSQL
452

 
- Using Case Expressions in PLSQL
454

 
- Using Nullif in PLSQL
458

 
- Using Coalesce in PLSQL
459

 
- Exercise Thirteen
460

Twenty Eight
Object Orientated Programming
465

 
- Introduction
466

 
- Definition of Objects
467

Twenty Nine
Row Objects
472

 
- Introduction
473

 
- Creating
474

 
- Metadata
475

 
- Data
476

 
- Indexes
477

 
- Views
479

 
- Removing
480

 
- OIDs
482

Thirty
Column Objects
490

 
- Introduction
491

 
- Describing
492

 
- Inserting Into
495

 
- Selecting from
497

 
- Updating
503

 
- Object Views
504

Thirty One
Defining Processes within Objects
506

 
- Introduction
507

 
- Defining Methods
508

 
- Member Methods
510

 
- Map Methods
517

 
- Member Methods
510

 
- Order Methods
519

 
- Constructor Methods
525

Thirty Two
PLSQL Data Structures and Collections
529

 
- Programmer Defined Records
530

 
- Nested Programmer Defined Records
534

 
- Varrays in PLSQL
537

 
- Using Varrays in Loops
540

 
- Populating Varrays
541

 
- Extending Varrays
542

 
- Deleting from Varrays
544

 
- Varrays and Tables
545

 
- Multilevel Varrays
548

Thirty Three
Associate Arrays (Index by Tables)
551

 
- Introducing Associate Arrays in PLSQL
552

 
- Declaring PLSQL Tables
554

 
- Populating PLSQL Tables
555

 
- Using Count with PLSQL Tables
557

 
- Using Delete with PLSQL Tables
558

 
- Using Exists with PLSQL Tables
559

 
- Using First/Last with PLSQL Tables
560

 
- Using Next/Prior with PLSQL Tables
561

 
- Using Varchar2 as an index with a PLSQL Table
562

 
- Multi-level PLSQL Table
566

 
- Nested PLSQL Table
567

 
- Cardinality with Nested Table
570

 
- Tidying Nested PLSQL Tables using Set
571

 
- Nested PLSQL Tables using Set
572

 
- Trimming Nested PLSQL Tables
574

 
- Multi-Level Nested PLSQL Tables
576

Thirty Four
Collection Comparisons
577

 
- Introduction
578

 
- Check for Equality
579

 
- Using IN with a Nested Table
582

 
- Using Member Of with a Nested Table
583

 
- Using Is Empty with a Nested Table
584

 
- Multiset Union
585

 
- Multiset Union Distinct
587

 
- Multiset Intersect
588

 
- Multiset Except
589

 
- Submultiset
590

 
- Not Submultiset
591

 
- Not Submultiset Alternative
592

 
- Exercise Fourteen
593

Thirty Five
Bulk SQL in PLSQL
596

 
- Introduction to Bulk Processing
597

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL
598

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL using Associate Arrays
599

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL using Varrays
600

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL using Nested Tables
601

 
- Forall with Save Exceptions
603

 
- Forall with SQL%BULKEXCEPTIONS
604

 
- Forall with Indices Of
607

 
- Forall with Values Of
609

 
- Bulk Collect with Implicit Cursors (Varray)
610

 
- Bulk Collect with Implicit Cursors (Associative Array)
611

 
- Bulk Collect with Implicit Cursors (Nested Table)
612

 
- Bulk Collect with Explicit Cursors
613

 
- Bulk Collect and Returning in PLSQL
614

 
- Problems with Bulk Processing in PLSQL
617

 
- Bulk Processing and Limit in PLSQL
618

Thirty Six
Invoker Rights in PLSQL
619

 
- The need to use Invoker Rights
620

 
- Example of Invoker Rights
621

 
- Using AUTHID in PLSQL
624

Thirty Seven
Forward Declaration
627

Thirty Eight
Advanced Exceptions
630

 
- Handling Exceptions in Sub-Processes in PLSQL
631

 
- Using Nocopy when Declaring Processes
633

 
- Using DBMS_UTILITY Functions
637

 
- DBMS_UTILITY.FORMAT_ERROR_STACK
638

 
- DBMS_UTILITY.FORMAT_BACKTRACE
639

 
- Exercise Fifteen
642

Thirty Nine
Advanced Use of Packages
647

 
- Introduction
648

 
- Defining Explicit Cursors in Packages
649

 
- Flexible Explicit Cursors in Packages
653

 
- Passing Parameters Using Packages
656

 
- Using PLSQL Tables as Parameters
659

 
- Global Variables using Packages
663

 
- Public and Private Variables in Packages
669

Forty
Overloading Modules in PLSQL
671

 
- Introduction
672

 
- Example
673

 
- User_Procedures
677

 
- Exercise Sixteen
678

Forty One
Regular Expressions in PLSQL (Regex)
684

 
- Introduction
685

 
- Using REGEXP_LIKE in Where Clauses
686

 
- Case Sensitivity
688

 
- Line Anchors
689

 
- Using the Dot (Any Character)
691

 
- Counting Characters {Intervals}
694

 
- Character Lists
698

 
- Excluding Character Lists
702

 
- Alternatives to Character Lists
703

 
- Class Shorthands
706

 
- Or Patterns (Alternatives)
707

 
- Or Patterns with Character Lists
708

 
- Using the Question Mark (Optional)
709

 
- Using the Plus sign (Mandatory)
712

 
- Using the Star sign (Optional)
714

 
- Backreferencing
715

 
- POSIX
717

 
- Using POSIX in Oracle – [:upper:] example
719

 
- Using POSIX in Oracle – [:digit:] example
720

 
- Using POSIX in Oracle – Character equivalents
721

 
- Using Regexp_like in PLSQL
722

 
- Using Regexp_count in PLSQL
725

 
- Using Regexp_replace in PLSQL
729

 
- Using Regexp_instr in PLSQL
731

 
- Using Regexp_substr in PLSQL
733

 
- Using Regular Expressions in Oracle
735

Forty Two
Using Alternative Quoting Mechanism in PLSQL
736

 
- Introduction
737

 
- Using Alternative Quoting Mechanism
738

 
- Exercise Seventeen
739

Forty Three
File I/O
743

 
- Reading and Writing Files in PLSQL
744

 
- Accessing the File System using Directories
745

 
- Creating Directories
746

 
- Simple Write using UTL_FILE.PUT_LINE
748

 
- Simple Read Using UTL_FILE.GET_LINE
749

 
- Additional Functions in the UTL_FILE Package
750

 
- Using UTL_FILE.PUTF in PLSQL
751

 
- UTL_FILE Exceptions
753

 
- Using UTL_FILE to perform Operating System Commands
755

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Fcopy in PLSQL
756

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Fgetattr in PLSQL
757

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Fremove in PLSQL
758

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Frename in PLSQL
759

Forty Four
Working with Clobs and Blobs in PLSQL
760

 
- Introduction
761

 
- Creation of Clobs in Tables
762

 
- Using Clobs in PLSQL
763

 
- Inserting Clobs into the Database using PLSQL
764

 
- Writing Clobs to the Filesystem using PLSQL
768

 
- Introduction to Blobs
769

 
- Inserting Blobs into the Database using PLSQL
770

 
- Writing Blobs into the Filesystem using PLSQL
771

 
- DBMS_LOB exceptions
774

Forty Five
DBMS_METADATA
776

 
- Generating Database Object Scripts
777

 
- List of Object Types
778

 
- Example of Using Dbms_Metadata
779

 
- Exercise Eighteen
781

Forty Six
Using Contexts
783

 
- Introduction
784

 
- Attributes
785

 
- User Defined
793

 
- Creating Contexts
794

 
- Creating a Package for a Context
795

 
- Creating a Context
796

 
- Populating a Context
797

 
- Accessing a Context
798

 
- Listing Contents of a Context
799

 
- Deleting Contents of a Context
801

 
- Changing Context Behaviour
803

Forty Seven
Subprogram Inlining
804

 
- Introduction
805

 
- Pragma Inline
806

 
- Example of Inlining
807

 
- Inlining Usage
812

 
- Conclusion
814

Forty Eight
PLSQL Compiler
815

 
- Introduction
816

 
- Warning Levels
817

 
- Enabling/Disabling Warning Levels
818

 
- Using the Alter Session
819

 
- Using the Error option
822

 
- Using the Dbms_warning Package
824

 
- Using the Dbms_warning.get_category
825

 
- Severe Category Errors
826

 
- Informational Category Errors
828

 
- Performance Category Errors
830

 
- Using Dbms_warning.set_warning_setting_string
831

 
- Using Dbms_warning.set_warning_setting_num
832

 
- Using Dbms_warning.set_warning_setting_cat
833

 
- User_plsql_object_settings
834

 
- Re-Compiling with same Warning settings
836

 
- PLSQL_Optimize_level
837

 
- Optimize Levels
838

 
- Timing Optimization with Dbms_utility.get_cpu_time
839

 
- Optimize Levels in User_plsql_object_settings
845

 
- Re-Compiling with same Optimize settings
846

 
- High Level Optimization without Pragma Inline
847

Forty Nine
Conditional Compilation in PLSQL
849

 
- Introduction
850

 
- Dbms_preprocessor
852

 
- Compiling using PLSQL_CCFLAGS
853

 
- PLSQL_CCFLAGS in PLSQL
855

 
- Using $error Directive
863

 
- Using Constants with CCFlags
865

 
- $$PLSQL_CODE_TYPE
866

 
- Oracle Compilation Modes
867

 
- $$PLSQL_OPTIMIZE_LEVEL
868

 
- $$PLSQL_LINE
869

 
- $$PLSQL_UNIT
870

 
- DBMS_DB_VERSION
871

 
- Setting Session CCFLags
873

 
- PLSQL_ccflags in user_plsql_object_settings
874

 
- PLSQL_ccflags in Triggers
875

Fifty
Timestamps in PLSQL
877

 
- Timestamps and Intervals in PLSQL
878

 
- Timestamp Variables in PLSQL
879

 
- Timestamp in PLSQL
881

 
- Populating Timestamps in PLSQL
884

 
- Using Extract in PLSQL
886

 
- Timestamp with Time Zone
887

 
- Timestamp Time Zone and Extract
890

 
- Using sys_extract_utc to Normalise Timestamps
891

 
- Using the To_Timestamp_TZ function
892

 
- Using the From_TZ function
894

 
- Timestamp with Local Time Zone
896

 
- Intervals
898

 
- Populating Year to Month Intervals
901

 
- Populating Day to Second Intervals
902

 
- Using Intervals in PLSQL
903

 
- Using Intervals with Extract in PLSQL
908

 
- Populating Intervals using Timestamps
909

 
- Exercise Nineteen
910

Fifty One
Dynamic SQL
914

 
- Introduction to Dynamic SQL
915

 
- Native Dynamic SQL (NDS) with Execute Immediate
916

 
- NDS Error Handling
919

 
- NDS with Inputs
920

 
- NDS with Output
922

 
- Dynamic Cursors and Sys_Refcursor
923

 
- NDS with Outputs
925

 
- Introduction to DBMS_SQL
926

 
- DBMS_SQL Example
927

 
- Exercise Twenty
928

 
 
 

Index of Oracle PLSQL 11g training course

Section
Contents
One
PLSQL Introduction
Two
PLSQL Structure
Three
The SQL*Plus Interface
Four
Performing Simple DML in PLSQL
Five
Performing Conditional Statements in PLSQL
Six
Communicating from PLSQL
Seven
Exception Handling
Eight
Implicit Cursors
Nine
Sub-Blocking in PLSQL
Ten
Explicit Cursors
Eleven
Using Sequences in PLSQL 11g
Twelve
Loop Processing
Thirteen
PL/SQL Database Objects
Fourteen
Programmer Defined Functions
Fifteen
Programmer Defined Procedures
Sixteen
Sub-programming Techniques
Seventeen
Autonomous Transactions in PLSQL
Eighteen
Packaging Programmer Defined Programs
Nineteen
DML Triggers in Oracle
Twenty
Instead Of Triggers
Twenty One
Compound Triggers
Twenty Two
System Triggers
Twenty Three
Rowtypes in PLSQL
Twenty Four
Advanced Cursors in Oracle 11g
Twenty Five
Encrypting Code
Twenty Six
Savepoints in PLSQL
Twenty Seven
Case Statements and Case Expressions
Twenty Eight
Object Orientated Programming
Twenty Nine
Row Objects
Thirty
Column Objects
Thirty One
Defining Processes within Objects
Thirty Two
PLSQL Data Structures and Collections
Thirty Three
Associate Arrays (Index by Tables)
Thirty Four
Collection Comparisons
Thirty Five
Bulk SQL in PLSQL
Thirty Six
Invoker Rights in PLSQL
Thirty Seven
Forward Declaration
Thirty Eight
Advanced Exceptions
Thirty Nine
Advanced Use of Packages
Forty
Overloading Modules in PLSQL
Forty One
Regular Expressions in PLSQL (Regex)
Forty Two
Using Alternative Quoting Mechanism in PLSQL
Forty Three
File I/O
Forty Four
Working with Clobs and Blobs in PLSQL
Forty Five
DBMS_METADATA
Forty Six
Using Contexts
Forty Seven
Subprogram Inlining
Forty Eight
PLSQL Compiler
Forty Nine
Conditional Compilation in PLSQL
Fifty
Timestamps in PLSQL
Fifty One
Dynamic SQL

Synopsis for Oracle PLSQL 11g training course

Most Developers wish they could design the perfect computer game like Angry Birds or Doom but the reality is that more people in IT work for Corporate businesses working on Databases processing information and making sure the integrity of the data is intact. Sounds boring? But Database design and maintenance is an essential part of modern Companies and therefore the demand for skilled technicians has never been higher and at the top of the list of any skills profile, Oracle DBAs and Programmers are always in the top five. Is it because it is such a difficult area to work in? no its because hardly a Company in the world doesn’t use or interface with an Oracle Database; it’s the de facto brand of Database and it’s the one to learn if you want a career in Business Computing.

This is the PLSQL course, it's an essential programming tool for all Developers and DBAs within the Oracle environment, it should be thought of as the second training course needed in your Oracle career, the first one being Oracle SQL, whilst SQL is the foundation, PLSQL allows more manipulation of the Database and the Objects within it.

Seer Computing provide training for both Oracle SQL and PLSQL and there are a number of different ones available, different in duration, content and version of the Oracle Database.

If you are looking for a Company training course then you will need to work out what version of the Database you are currently supporting and whether you are updating to a newer version any time soon, if you are a private individual, we would recommend you have the latest version of the Database training course, they are mostly interchangeable and therefore there would be little to gain from having the exact version of a potential employer's Database.

This course is based on Oracle's Database 11g, this was first released in 2007 and is therefore over quite elderly when it comes to versions of Oracle, when you speak to one of our Training Advisers they will gladly help you choose the correct version and training course for your requirement.

Our latest versions of courses are scheduled regularly at public venues throughout the year around the UK and Ireland, if you are just booking for yourself this may be an alternative, although we are always happy to perform one to one training.

Whatever training course you choose they all have the same features; We provide all necessary equipment for the duration of the course, that includes a machine for each Delegate and of course we use our own Database and Network. Included in the pricing of the course is the cost of all our incidentals, there is no wholly subject to costs etc, the price we give you is the price you pay plus VAT at the current rate set by the Government. All course Delegates have a copy of the course manual which is theirs to make notes in and keep after the course has finished, its printed on high quality paper and therefore should be a handy reference aid for years to come.

This particular course, the PLSQL 11g is five day duration, it has 20 exercises dotted throughout the week, plenty of practice for Delegates fully supported by our professional Training Consultants, at the end of the course they can take a copy of their work with them as well as a solutions CD from us, filled with lots of example code to copy and hack away at.

Oracle isn’t the only specialist area for Seer Computing, we have courses in Java, JavaScript, PHP etc, look at our menu system and see how comprehensive our business training in, we can also provide consultancy in Oracle Database design and Project Management. Give us a call, see what we can do for you.

Request for detailsClick for the contact form for the PLSQL 11g training course
Public Courses
Oracle Essential SQL 19c
Days
2
Pages
340
Exercises
8
Sections
15
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Oracle Essential PLSQL 19c
Days
3
Pages
384
Exercises
13
Sections
25
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Using SQL with Oracle SQL Developer 19.2
Days
4
Pages
884
Exercises
18
Sections
37
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Essential JavaScript
Days
4
Pages
660
Exercises
16
Sections
31
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Essential CSS 3
Days
4
Pages
800
Exercises
15
Sections
30
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Essential SQLite 3
Days
3
Pages
550
Exercises
12
Sections
24
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Essential MySQL 8
Days
4
Pages
533
Exercises
16
Sections
24
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Essential Python 3
Days
5
Pages
955
Exercises
17
Sections
41
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Oracle Application Express 20
Days
0
Pages
0
Exercises
0
Sections
0
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
PHP 7.4 and Oracle 19c
Days
5
Pages
917
Exercises
21
Sections
38
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Java 14 Programming with Eclipse 2020-03
Days
5
Pages
788
Exercises
23
Sections
44
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Public Courses
Java 14 Swing with Eclipse 2020-03
Days
5
Pages
756
Exercises
19
Sections
35
Public
Yes
On-Site
Yes
Click on the course name to see full details, left and right to view other courses