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Advanced PLSQL 11g
 
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Advanced PLSQL 11g course at a glance

Pages
784No of slides in the Manual
Exercises
9Total No of Exercises
Sections
36No of main topics, see index below
Public
NoPublic course in the UK and Ireland
On-Site
YesWe can come to your venue
Level
21 - Beginners
2 - Intermediate
3 - Advanced
Days
3Week days but we can put on weekend courses
Duration:
Minimum skill level required:
On-Site course:
Public course:
Sections:
No of exercises:
No of pages in the manual:
Pre-Requisite course(s):
Suggested further course(s):
Price guide:
3 days
2 (1 - Beginner, 2 - Experienced 3 - Advanced)
Yes
No
36
9
784
Oracle Essential SQL 11g Oracle Essential PLSQL 11g
None
Contact us for the latest pricing

Index of Advanced Oracle PLSQL 11g training course

Section
Contents
 

One
Advanced PL/SQL 11g Introduction
2

 
- Introduction
3

 
- Overview of PLSQL Structure
4

 
- Overview of DBMS_OUTPUT
5

 
- Overview of Exceptions
8

 
- Overview of raise_application_error
11

 
- Overview of Alternative Quoting Mechanism
13

 
- Overview of Sequences
15

 
- Overview of Savepoints
16

 
- Overview of Conditional Statements
18

Two
Defining Variables in PLSQL
25

 
- Variables in PLSQL
26

 
- Quoted Identifier Variables in PLSQL
27

 
- Numeric Variables in PLSQL
30

 
- Number Variables in PLSQL
31

 
- Decimal Variables in PLSQL
34

 
- Integer Variables in PLSQL
35

 
- PLS_Integer Variables in PLSQL
36

 
- Binary_Integer Variables in PLSQL
37

 
- Natural Variables in PLSQL
38

 
- Naturaln Variables in PLSQL
39

 
- Positive Variables in PLSQL
40

 
- Positiven Variables in PLSQL
41

 
- Signtype Variables in PLSQL
42

 
- Simple_Integer Variables in PLSQL
43

 
- Defining Variables Using %Type
44

 
- Defining Variables Using %Rowtype
45

 
- Populating a Variable which is a %Rowtype
47

 
- Defining Constants
48

Three
Sub-blocking in PLSQL
50

 
- Introduction
51

 
- Defining Sub-Blocks
52

 
- Re-Raising Exceptions in PLSQL
57

Four
Loop Processing in PLSQL
60

 
- Overview of Looping in PLSQL
61

 
- Basic Looping in PLSQL
62

 
- While Looping in PLSQL
63

 
- For Looping in PLSQL
64

 
- Using Dates in For Loops in PLSQL
66

 
- Using Characters in For Loops in PLSQL
67

 
- Loop Labels in PLSQL
68

 
- Loop Continue and Continue When in PLSQL
70

Five
Timestamps
74

 
- Timestamps and Intervals in PLSQL
75

 
- Timestamp Variables in PLSQL
76

 
- Timestamp in PLSQL
78

 
- Populating Timestamps in PLSQL
81

 
- Using Extract in PLSQL
83

 
- Timestamp with Time Zone
84

 
- Timestamp Time Zone and Extract
87

 
- Using sys_extract_utc to normalise Timestamps
88

 
- Using the To_Timestamp_TZ function
89

 
- Using the From_TZ function
91

 
- Timestamp with Local Time Zone
93

 
- Intervals
95

 
- Populating Year to Month Intervals
98

 
- Populating Day to Second Intervals
99

 
- Using Intervals in PLSQL
100

 
- Using Intervals with Extract in PLSQL
105

 
- Populating Intervals using Timestamps
106

 
- Exercise One
107

Six
Case Statements and Case Expressions
113

 
- Introduction
114

 
- Using Searched Case in PLSQL
115

 
- Using Case in PLSQL
116

 
- Using Nested Case in PLSQL
117

 
- Using Case Expressions in PLSQL
119

 
- Using Nullif in PLSQL
123

 
- Using Coalesce in PLSQL
124

Seven
Cursors in Oracle 11g
125

 
- Overview of Cursors
126

 
- Overview of Implicit Cursors
127

 
- Looping an Implicit Cursor with a For Loop
129

 
- Overview of Explicit Cursors
130

 
- Overview of Explicit Cursor Attributes
132

 
- Overview of Explicit Cursor Parameters
133

 
- Looping an Explicit Cursor with a For Loop
135

 
- Using other Loops with Explicit Cursors
136

 
- Explicit Cursors Versus Implicit Cursors
139

Eight
Advanced Explicit Cursors
140

 
- For Update with Explicit Cursors
141

 
- Where Current Of Explicit Cursors
142

 
- Example of Updating with Explicit Cursors
143

 
- Using Nowait with Explicit Cursors
144

 
- Using Skip Locked with Explicit Cursors
145

 
- Using Wait with an Explicit Cursor
146

 
- Using Rowid with Explicit Cursors
147

 
- Using Returning Into in PLSQL
148

 
- Using Rowtype for DML
151

 
- Populating a Variable which is a %Rowtype
153

 
- Passing a %Rowtype between Processes
155

 
- Declaring a Cursor %Rowtype
157

 
- Exercise Two
160

Nine
Overview of PL/SQL Database Objects
164

 
- PLSQL Objects
165

 
- Function syntax
166

 
- Procedure syntax
167

 
- Advantages of Packaging
168

 
- Package syntax
169

 
- Package Body syntax
171

 
- Re-Compiling PLSQL Objects
172

 
- Defining Parameters in PLSQL
173

 
- Running Objects in PLSQL
176

 
- Passing Parameters
179

 
- Out Parameters in PLSQL
181

Ten
Advanced Object Techniques
183

 
- Sub-programming
184

 
- Sub-programming Example
185

 
- Sub-programming Limitations
186

 
- Forward Declaration
187

 
- Autonomous Transactions
191

 
- Example of an Autonomous Transactions
193

 
- Ref Cursors in PLSQL
200

 
- Strongly Typed Ref Cursors in PLSQL
201

 
- Weakly Typed Ref Cursors in PLSQL
203

 
- Sys_refcursor in PLSQL
204

 
- Using Sys_Refcursors with SQL
206

 
- Private Processes in PLSQL Packages
210

 
- Handling Exceptions in Packages in PLSQL
213

Eleven
Overloading Modules in Packages
215

 
- Introduction
216

 
- Example
217

 
- User_Procedures
222

Twelve
Advanced Packages
223

 
- Introduction
224

 
- Defining Explicit Cursors in Packages
225

 
- Flexible Explicit Cursors in Packages
229

 
- Passing Parameters Using Packages
232

 
- Global Variables using Packages
235

 
- Public and Private Variables in Packages
242

Thirteen
Advanced Exception Handling
244

 
- The Third Boolean Parameter
245

 
- Raising User Defined Exceptions in PLSQL
246

 
- Pragma Exceptions in PLSQL
249

 
- Alternative Way to Handle SQL Errors in PLSQL
251

 
- Handling SQL Errors in PLSQL
252

 
- Advanced SQLErrm
254

 
- Nesting Exceptions in PLSQL
255

 
- Re-Raising Exceptions in PLSQL
258

 
- Handling Exceptions in Sub-Processes in PLSQL
260

 
- Using Nocopy When Declaring Processes
264

 
- Using DBMS_UTILITY Functions
268

 
- Using DBMS_UTILITY.FORMAT_ERROR_STACK
269

 
- Using DBMS_UTILITY.FORMAT_BACKTRACE
270

 
- Exercise Three
273

Fourteen
DML Triggers in Oracle
284

 
- Introduction
285

 
- DML Triggers Introduction
286

 
- DML Triggers Timing Points
289

 
- DML Triggers When Conditions
290

 
- DML Triggers When Conditions Examples
291

 
- Syntax of DML Triggers in PLSQL
293

 
- Referencing Values within Triggers
294

 
- Checking the Event which fired the DML Trigger
298

 
- Using the Follows syntax to dictate Trigger Firing
300

 
- Using the Disable syntax when Compiling Triggers
305

 
- Enabling/Disabling Triggers in an Oracle Database
306

 
- Metadata for Triggers (User_Triggers)
308

 
- Mutating DML Triggers in Oracle
309

 
- Using Autonomous Transactions in Triggers
313

Fifteen
Instead Of Triggers
315

 
- Introduction to Instead Of Triggers
316

 
- Syntax of an Instead Of Trigger in Oracle
319

 
- Example of an Instead Of Trigger
321

 
- Deleting Records in Oracle using an Instead Of
329

 
- Using Follows in an Instead Of Trigger
330

 
- Exercise Four
331

Sixteen
Compound Triggers
340

 
- Introduction to Compound Triggers
341

 
- Syntax for Table Compound Triggers
343

 
- Declaration Section
344

 
- Timing Points
345

 
- BEFORE STATEMENT
346

 
- BEFORE EACH ROW
347

 
- AFTER EACH ROW
348

 
- AFTER STATEMENT
349

 
- Compound Triggers for Views
350

Seventeen
System Triggers
351

 
- Introduction to System Triggers
352

 
- Syntax for System Triggers in Oracle
353

 
- System Event Triggers
354

 
- User Event Triggers
355

 
- Schema Event Triggers
359

 
- Database Level Attributes for System Triggers
365

 
- Exercise Five
366

Eighteen
Using Contexts
371

 
- Introduction
372

 
- Attributes
373

 
- User Defined
381

 
- Creating Contexts
382

 
- Creating a Package for a Context
383

 
- Creating a Context
384

 
- Populating a Context
385

 
- Accessing a Context
386

 
- Listing Contents of a Context
387

 
- Deleting Contents of a Context
389

 
- Changing Context Behaviour
391

Nineteen
Subprogram Inlining
392

 
- Introduction
393

 
- Pragma Inline
394

 
- Example of Inlining
395

 
- Inlining Usage
400

 
- Conclusion
402

Twenty
PLSQL Compiler
403

 
- Introduction
404

 
- Warning Levels
405

 
- Enabling/Disabling Warning Levels
406

 
- Using the Alter Session
407

 
- Using the Error option
410

 
- Using DBMS_WARNING Package
412

 
- Using DBMS_WARNING.GET_CATEGORY
413

 
- Severe Category Errors
414

 
- Informational Category Errors
416

 
- Performance Category Errors
418

 
- Using dbms_warning.set_warning_setting_string
419

 
- Using dbms_warning.set_warning_setting_num
420

 
- Using dbms_warning.set_warning_setting_cat
421

 
- USER_PLSQL_OBJECT_SETTINGS
422

 
- Re-Compiling with same Warning settings
424

 
- PLSQL_OPTIMIZE_LEVEL
425

 
- Optimize Levels
426

 
- Timing Optimization with dbms_utility.get_cpu_time
427

 
- Optimize Levels in user_plsql_object_settings
433

 
- Re-Compiling with same Optimize settings
434

 
- High Level Optimization without Pragma Inline
435

Twenty One
Conditional Compilation in PLSQL
437

 
- Introduction
438

 
- Dbms_preprocessor
440

 
- Compiling using PLSQL_CCFLAGS
441

 
- PLSQL_CCFLAGS in PLSQL
443

 
- Using $error Directive
451

 
- Using Constants with CCFlags
453

 
- $$PLSQL_CODE_TYPE
454

 
- Oracle Compilation Modes
455

 
- $$PLSQL_OPTIMIZE_LEVEL
456

 
- $$PLSQL_LINE
457

 
- $$PLSQL_UNIT
458

 
- DBMS_DB_VERSION
459

 
- Setting Session CCFlags
461

 
- Plsql_ccflags in user_plsql_object_settings
462

 
- Plsql_ccflags in Triggers
463

Twenty Two
Regular Expressions in PLSQL (Regex)
465

 
- Introduction
466

 
- Using REGEXP_LIKE in Where Clauses
467

 
- Case Sensitivity
469

 
- Line Anchors
470

 
- Using the Dot (Any Character)
472

 
- Counting Characters {Intervals}
475

 
- Character Lists
479

 
- Excluding Character Lists
483

 
- Alternatives to Character Lists
484

 
- Class Shorthands
487

 
- Or Patterns (Alternatives)
488

 
- Or Patterns with Character Lists
489

 
- Using the Question Mark (Optional)
490

 
- Using the Plus sign (Mandatory)
493

 
- Using the Star sign (Optional)
495

 
- Backreferencing
496

 
- POSIX
498

 
- Using POSIX in Oracle - [:upper] example
500

 
- Using POSIX in Oracle - [:digit] example
501

 
- Using POSIX in Oracle – Character equivalents
502

 
- Using Regexp_like in PLSQL
503

 
- Using Regexp_count in PLSQL
506

 
- Using Regexp_replace in PLSQL
510

 
- Using Regexp_instr in PLSQL
512

 
- Using Regexp_substr in PLSQL
514

 
- Using Regular Expressions in Oracle
516

 
- Exercise Six
517

Twenty Three
File I/O
524

 
- Reading and Writing from the Operating System in PLSQL
525

 
- Accessing the File System using Directories
526

 
- Creating Directories
527

 
- Simple Write using UTL_FILE.PUT_LINE
529

 
- Simple Read using UTL_FILE.GET_LINE
530

 
- Additional Functions in the UTL_FILE Package
531

 
- Using UTL_FILE.PUTF in PLSQL
532

 
- UTL_FILE Exceptions
534

 
- Using UTL_FILE to perform Operating System Commands
536

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Fcopy in PLSQL
537

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Fgetattr in PLSQL
538

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Fremove in PLSQL
539

 
- Using UTL_FILE.Frename in PLSQL
540

Twenty Four
Working with Clobs and Blobs in PLSQL
541

 
- Introduction
542

 
- Creation of Clobs in Tables
543

 
- Using Clobs in PLSQL
544

 
- Inserting Clobs into the Database using PLSQL
545

 
- Writing Clobs to the Filesystem using PLSQL
549

 
- Introduction to Blobs
550

 
- Inserting Blobs into the Database using PLSQL
551

 
- Writing Blobs into the Filesystem using PLSQL
552

 
- DBMS_LOB exceptions
555

Twenty Five
DBMS_Metadata
557

 
- Generating Database Object Scripts
558

 
- List of Object Types
559

 
- Example of Using DBMS_Metadata
560

Twenty Six
Encrypting Code
562

 
- Introduction
563

 
- Using Wrap.exe to encrypt processes in Oracle
564

 
- Example of using Wrap.exe to encrypt processes
567

 
- Using DBMS_DDL.CREATE_WRAPPED Function
569

 
- Exercise Seven
573

Twenty Seven
Object Orientated Programming
577

 
- Introduction
578

 
- Definition of Objects
579

Twenty Eight
Row Objects
585

 
- Introduction
586

 
- Creating
587

 
- Metadata
589

 
- Data
590

 
- Indexes
591

 
- Views
593

 
- Removing
594

 
- OIDs
596

Twenty Nine
Column Objects
604

 
- Introduction
605

 
- Describing
606

 
- Inserting into
609

 
- Selecting from
611

 
- Updating
617

 
- Object Views
618

Thirty
Defining Processes within Objects
620

 
- Introduction
621

 
- Defining Methods
622

 
- Member Methods
624

 
- Map Methods
631

 
- Order Methods
633

 
- Constructor Methods
639

Thirty One
PLSQL Data Structures and Collections
643

 
- Programmer Defined Records
644

 
- Nested Programmer Defined Records
648

 
- Varrays in PLSQL
650

 
- Using Varrays in Loops
653

 
- Populating Varrays
654

 
- Extending Varrays
655

 
- Deleting from Varrays
657

 
- Varrays and Tables
658

 
- Multilevel Varrays
661

Thirty Two
Associate Arrays (Index by Tables)
664

 
- Introducing Associate Arrays in PLSQL
665

 
- Declaring PLSQL Tables
667

 
- Populating PLSQL Tables
668

 
- Using Count with PLSQL Tables
670

 
- Using Delete with PLSQL Tables
671

 
- Using Exists with PLSQL Tables
672

 
- Using First/Last with PLSQL Tables
673

 
- Using Next/Prior with PLSQL Tables
674

 
- Using Varchar2 as an index with a PLSQL Table
675

 
- Multi-Level PLSQL Table
679

 
- Nested PLSQL Table
680

 
- Cardinality with Nested Table
683

 
- Tidying Nested PLSQL Tables using Set
684

 
- Nested PLSQL Tables using Set
685

 
- Trimming Nested PLSQL Tables
687

 
- Multi-Level Nested PLSQL Tables
689

 
- Using PLSQL Tables as Parameters
690

Thirty Three
Collection Comparisons
694

 
- Introduction
695

 
- Check for Equality
696

 
- Using IN with a Nested Table
699

 
- Using Member Of with a Nested Table
700

 
- Using Is Empty with a Nested Table
701

 
- Multiset Union
702

 
- Multiset Union Distinct
704

 
- Multiset Intersect
705

 
- Multiset Except
706

 
- Submultiset
707

 
- Not Submultiset
708

 
- Not Submultiset Alternative
709

 
- Exercise Eight
710

Thirty Four
Bulk SQL in PLSQL
713

 
- Introduction to Bulk Processing
714

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL
715

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL Using Associate Arrays
716

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL Using Varrays
717

 
- Bulk Binding in PLSQL Using Nested Tables
718

 
- Forall with Save Exceptions
719

 
- Forall with SQL%BULKEXCEPTIONS
721

 
- Forall with Indices Of
724

 
- Forall with Values Of
726

 
- Bulk Collect with Implicit Cursors (Varray)
727

 
- Bulk Collect with Implicit Cursors (Associative Array)
728

 
- Bulk Collect with Implicit Cursors (Nested Table)
729

 
- Bulk Collect with Explicit Cursors
730

 
- Bulk Collect and Returning in PLSQL
731

 
- Problems with Bulk Processing in PLSQL
734

 
- Bulk Processing and Limit in PLSQL
735

Thirty Five
Invoker Rights in PLSQL
736

 
- The need to use Invoker Rights
737

 
- Example of Invoker Rights
738

 
- Using AUTHID in PLSQL
741

Thirty Six
Virtual Private Databases (VPD)
744

 
- Introduction
745

 
- DBMS_RLS
746

 
- Creating Functions for use with VPD
747

 
- Applying Policies
749

 
- Viewing Policies in Metadata
752

 
- Row Level Security (RLS)
753

 
- Removing Row Level Security (RLS)
754

 
- Using Policy Types with DBMS_RLS
756

 
- Introducing Flexibility to VPD
757

 
- Column Level Masks
758

 
- Using Sec_relevant_cols
759

 
- Using Sec_relevant_cols_opt
762

 
- Introducing Flexibility to VPD
757

Thirty Seven
Dynamic SQL
765

 
- Introduction to Dynamic SQL
766

 
- Native Dynamic SQL (NDS) with Execute Immediate
767

 
- NDS Error Handling
770

 
- NDS with Inputs
771

 
- NDS with Output
773

 
- Dynamic Cursors and Sys_Refcursor
774

 
- NDS with Outputs
776

 
- Introduction to DBMS_SQL
777

 
- DBMS_SQL.Example
778

 
- Exercise Nine
779

Index of Advanced Oracle PLSQL 11g training course

Section
Contents
One
Advanced PL/SQL 11g Introduction
Two
Defining Variables in PLSQL
Three
Sub-blocking in PLSQL
Four
Loop Processing in PLSQL
Five
Timestamps
Six
Case Statements and Case Expressions
Seven
Cursors in Oracle 11g
Eight
Advanced Explicit Cursors
Nine
Overview of PL/SQL Database Objects
Ten
Advanced Object Techniques
Eleven
Overloading Modules in Packages
Twelve
Advanced Packages
Thirteen
Advanced Exception Handling
Fourteen
DML Triggers in Oracle
Fifteen
Instead Of Triggers
Sixteen
Compound Triggers
Seventeen
System Triggers
Eighteen
Using Contexts
Nineteen
Subprogram Inlining
Twenty
PLSQL Compiler
Twenty One
Conditional Compilation in PLSQL
Twenty Two
Regular Expressions in PLSQL (Regex)
Twenty Three
File I/O
Twenty Four
Working with Clobs and Blobs in PLSQL
Twenty Five
DBMS_Metadata
Twenty Six
Encrypting Code
Twenty Seven
Object Orientated Programming
Twenty Eight
Row Objects
Twenty Nine
Column Objects
Thirty
Defining Processes within Objects
Thirty One
PLSQL Data Structures and Collections
Thirty Two
Associate Arrays (Index by Tables)
Thirty Three
Collection Comparisons
Thirty Four
Bulk SQL in PLSQL
Thirty Five
Invoker Rights in PLSQL
Thirty Six
Virtual Private Databases (VPD)
Thirty Seven
Dynamic SQL

Synopsis for Advanced Oracle PLSQL 11g training course

From the outside being a Computer Developer is a boring job but where else would you get to play with the latest tech and make them work and make them better for other people to use ?

Working with an Oracle Database can be a very rewarding occupation, handling many millions of records, efficiently producing output and protecting the information within from injections of invalid data.

To use the Database, Developers need primarily to have SQL and PLSQL knowledge and to gain that in the quickest possible time they need high quality professional training in some cases local to their place of work or home. Seer Computing can take your raw Delegates and turn them into programming giants handling all Database queries in their stride.

We provide on-site and scheduled courses throughout the UK and Ireland and specialise in Oracle software so be assured you are in safe hands. We celebrated 20 years in the business in 2020 and are still here so must be doing something right.

This website contains details of over 140 training courses, each one available on-site at your venue or close to it depending on what works best for you, each training course page contains information about that course, length of time and details of the course contents. Have a look at the course index for this course, see if it is what you are looking for, if it isn’t have a look through our menu and find the one that is or alternatively talk to one of our training people, they can advise you on your requirements.

This is the Advanced Oracle 11g PLSQL course which has been designed as a follow on from our Essential PLSQL course, please note that this is an older version of the Oracle Database, we have courses which cover newer versions, please refer to the top of the page to view them.

We also have a five day PLSQL course which is a combination of the Essential PLSQL and this course the Advanced PLSQL course.

When you look at the index contents for this course you may see things you don’t want your Delegates to learn or maybe find things in one of other courses they should have, we can customise the course to whatever shape you require, this will be without further charge and may even save a day of training.

Bear in mind this is an Advanced PLSQL course this means we anticipate the training to appeal to Developers who have already attended our Essential SQL and PLSQL courses, this is a follow on to teach more advanced techniques and fill in gaps which they may not even know are there, take a look at the other courses in this range.

This course is only available on-site at your venue, at an agreed location close to your venue or you can come to our offices in Swansea, most Companies choose to host the training at their premises, this means we come to you bringing all the equipment necessary for the course, we don’t need your Network or access to your Database, we run a self-sealed training laboratory with each person having their own workstation for the duration of the training.

When we quote for training we give you the total cost and that is what you pay, no added expenses or charges for machine usage etc … Our quotations are frozen for six months so you can think through the prices, get the budget and we will guarantee the amount. You choose the start date and time and we will flex to your requirements.

Please contact our offices today for a quotation

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